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non-traditional jobs that let you travel

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“Digital nomad” is more than a buzzword – it’s a way of life for a lot of travel lovers. Not all of these workers are self-employed, either! There are many careers based around travel, or ways you can work while traveling the country or the world. If you’re looking for a more creative job that puts you on the road more often (or even a side hustle that helps pad your travel account), I have a few ideas for you!

Flight attendant: Full disclosure: I’ve secretly always dreamed of being a flight attendant. One of my favorite blogs, The Flight Attendant Life, does nothing to dissuade this desire. It’s definitely hard work, though. Not only do you get to travel as part of your job, you’ll also have the perk of layovers, flight benefits on your days off, and a lot of flight attendants are based out of crash pads in tropical locations. (Kara from The Flight Attendant Life was even based in Hawaii.) The major airlines aren’t the only ones hiring: smaller airlines like Allegiant and Frontier also have lucrative options, and smaller, boutique airliners are catering to travelers who prefer a bit more comfort. It’s not a pretty website, but Flight Attendant Careers gets updated regularly by tons of airlines adding to their workforce.

Amazon: The online retailer hires hundreds of seasonal “pickers” every year, and they often provide camping facilities for their employees as well so you’re never too far from home. Here’s one review of their work camping experience, and they also offer work from home positions in their customer service department.

Yachting: It turns out that yachting is a dream job I didn’t even know I had until I happened to see Below Deck on Bravo one day (the source of all dream jobs, right?) These positions can be super lucrative, but they are hard work. You’re stuck on a small boat for weeks or months with the same few people, serving to assist the owners or charter guests, and depending on your position, doing laundry all day and night. (Which, honestly, doesn’t seem like the worst job on a yacht.) Read Lucky Charming by Kate Chastain (yachtie on Below Deck,) check out jobs on CrewfindersYacrew, and Bluewater Yachting – or just move down to one of the yacht capitals to get head hunted.

VA: Being a virtual assistant is one of the most popular careers for digital nomads, and with good reason. Because there are so many tools out there that let you automate things like social posting, easily edit photos, and communicate with clients no matter what time zone you’re in (not to mention hotspots that allow you to hop on the internet from anywhere,) it’s one of the most flexible jobs available. Like I mentioned in my post on jobs you can do from home, larger VAs or agencies hire subcontractors if you don’t want to start your own business.

Music tour jobs: Growing up, my dream was to be a tour manager. I would still love to go on the road someday, but I’m at an age where it doesn’t really seem like it’s going to happen for me anymore. The music industry does tend to be all about who you know, with jobs often coming through by word of mouth. Bobnet was started at as listserv a few years ago, and it has an online board and Facebook group now where jobs are shared. roadiejobs.com is a resource that does post some tour jobs, and it’s worth checking out (but don’t expect to see a lot of every city as you tour – drives are long, days are longer, and sleep usually takes priority over sightseeing.) Another option to get on the road is to work with a sponsor for a big tour, like Warped Tour. Anti-smoking organization The Truth hires “riders” to travel to schools, concerts, and other events for promotions and marketing. If you’re vegan, PETA also hires touring interns and employees, as do other non-profits on the tour. A lot of them are internships or volunteer positions, but if this is a career you’re interested in and you’re in college, it’s an invaluable experience to have under your belt.

(Or think really outside the box – NASCAR races and teams also travel every weekend, and they have sponsors and merch trucks that need sellers too!)

Dance companies: I love Dance Moms, what can I say. The idea of spending weekends working at dance competitions actually just seems humorous to me! Aside from the parental drama, I do love dance and some of them are really beautiful and moving. Groove, Starquest, and NextLevelDance are just a few of the companies that produce these events.

Bus driving: If you like responsibility and prefer to travel with your wheels on the ground, bus driving is something to explore. Whether working for a travel company like Greyhound or as a private charter, you’ll have the option for long haul tours or jaunts that keep you closer to home.

For a similar side hustle on a smaller scale, look into limousine services or car rental businesses. Even a few hours of driving a week can result in lots of extra tips!

Cruise ships: “But you already talked about boats,” you might be saying. Cruise ships are an entirely different animal than the luxury world of yachting. They seem to have lower pay as there aren’t large tips (traditionally) on cruises, but they do offer many different niches like live entertainment or food service. Apply directly to a cruise line, check the job board at All Cruise Jobs, or hit indeed.com – some cruise lines even hire reservation agents and customer service staff to work remotely.

Event companies: Like the music tour sponsor and marketing companies, there are businesses that are dedicated to setting up large-scale events. These jobs have always seemed super fun, and I have quite a few friends that have worked for companies like Red Frog Events and Compass Rose. Traveling to different cities every week to set up conferences or fitness events, there is often some downtime to head out and check out the locale.

Tour guide: If you’re comfortable leading groups, this could be the best job for you. There are lots of organized travel agencies out there looking for trip leaders! G Adventures has a long history, as does Contiki, who hires local drivers as well as guides. Newer organizations like Remote Year are also looking for operations and experience managers in the cities they visit. If you have a lot of travel experience in a particular region, you can even make more!

Theater crew: If you’re artistically inclined but haven’t ever wanted to chase the rock ‘n roll lifestyle, a touring theater group could be your ticket to fame. (See what I did there?) Since plays and musicals tend to have longer stays in specific towns than music tours, they might be more desirable for someone not interested in the rushed pace of a different city every day. Even if you’re not a performer, there’s a place for you. Check out opportunities with specific troupes (like Cirque du Soleil or Blue Man Group!) or check out job boards at Playbill. brokeGIRLrich also has a super comprehensive resource of theatre job boards as well!

Housesitting: Yes, there are some people who make a career of housesitting! Many wealthy people who have multiple residences hire house sitters to stay at their different homes while they’re away. These positions usually involve a small bit of housekeeping or maintenance, but who cares? For free board in a lot of beautiful locations, I would probably have the tile floors scrubbed cleaned. Most of the job search sites for these positions are paid, and there’s a lot of background checks that can go into the application (with good reason.) Depending on what you’re looking for, House Sitters America, Luxury House Sitters and The Caretaker Gazette are good places to start. Even care.com has opportunities for house sitters!

National Parks: Any tourism industry will have boom and bust times where they need to hire more employees. National Parks are no different, and they’re a popular job option for many retirees who still want to work, but want to travel. It’s not just for retirees, though – many younger people are choosing this option to head out and explore. Check out this post on finding a job in a National Park!

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May 19, 2017
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7 companies hiring work from home employees right now

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7 companies hiring work from home employees

Happy Cinco de Mayo! There are a wide variety of job types that can be done remotely, and lots of companies are hiring work from home employees! It’s not just for web developers and designers anymore – there are positions in every industry, including marketing and content writing, customer service and tech support, and even human resources. Here are seven positions you can apply to now – some of them even without any experience on your resume yet!

Customer Support Specialist at Formstack: Customer service can be one of the easiest ways to move into a remote position, if you’re not technically inclined. This position with Formstack will let you work with customers and start building your technical skills, like troubleshooting and hosting webinars!

Customer Experience at HotelTonight: HotelTonight is a great resource for budget travelers, and I’ve personally used it a few times in my life. They hire remote customer service agents from specific states – currently Tennessee, Texas, Florid and Oregon – with different multilingual skills. (And if you need to grab a hotel, use my discount code DESIR2 for $20 off!)

Search Wrangler at Automattic: Automattic are the people who power WordPress and some of the most popular plugins: Jetpack and Woocommerce, for example. The Search Wrangler will use systems to connect related content so readers are finding the most relevant posts for whatever they’re reading. Automattic has week-long meetups each year, so their worldwide workforce can connect and build relationships to brainstorm new projects. See all available positions here!

Sales Representatives at HSN: Oh, how my family would love for someone to work in this position. HSN’s phone representatives work from home, so in addition to a computer and high-speed internet, you’ll need a landline as well. They’ve also recently moved their customer service department from Florida to Ohio, so you’ll need to live in a few specific counties in mid-Ohio – it’s an area I know well, though, and really love!

Growth Product Manager at Zapier: If you’re into setting and achieving business goals and helping people automate tasks, this role could be for you. Zapier is a service that lets people automate tasks between many different Saas programs (with more being added every day.) For this role, they’re looking for a tech-minded team player so if that’s you, apply today! Zapier seems like a really great company, and they have other positions open as well.

Production Services Systems Engineer at Basecamp: Basecamp is one of my favorite tools for remote work, so of course their team is distributed. They’re hiring two new team members for their Operations department for developers with lots of experience working with cloud-based applications.

Contract Technical Recruiter at GitHub: GitHub is built for coding, but it’s not just made up of developers. Right now, there are several HR positions open, like this remote Sourcer position. They’ll attract and recruit new staffers for the entire organization. It’s not just their HR team that’s hiring – their support, marketing, and engineering departments are looking as well!

I’m going to make this a monthly series here on the blog, and I send out even more jobs to my mailing list subscribers (not to mention the fun freebies I’m working on.) Be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss out!

May 5, 2017
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tools to use to excel in a remote job

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This post contains affiliate links.

Working from home has been growing in popularity – whether it’s owning your own business, freelancing, or contracting for a larger company, there are many ways you can start working from home. No more commute, no freezing office, and no annoying cubicle neighbors – sounds awesome, right? While it is really great, it’s not always as easy as it sounds, and these kinds of jobs are competitive. Today I’m sharing some of the most popularly used tools at a lot of virtual companies! The exact programs and apps you might use in yours can differ based on your company and position, but this is a good start on tools to start using that you could see in your position.

If you have a moment before diving in, please take a minute to fill out my reader survey!

Slack: There are a few team communication tools out there, but Slack is by far the most popular. It’s super comprehensive – not only is it built for instant messaging, they also recently introduced a built-in voice call integration, and you can even upload and share files. Lots of other programs have apps that can be installed (even Giphy!) so you can do things like search for travel with Hipmunk, get calendar reminders, and even use Stop. Breathe. Think. to meditate. This is probably one of the most important tools to have on your resume – and it’s super simple to use. Though Slack isn’t a remote company, they do have a job search site for companies that use Slack, and you can search for remote opportunities with Slack At Work!

Basecamp/Asana: Project management software can make your work life so much easier. Basecamp and Asana both make communication among teams easier with different project “boards” for various products, allowing you to set to-dos, timelines, and even more. I’ve used both Asana and Basecamp, and I prefer Basecamp more. (They’re also a virtual company, so watch for opportunities with them once you’ve gotten comfortable!) They also have free classes every week to help you learn and use Basecamp super effectively.  You can use my referral link as well to save on your Basecamp account.

If you want to learn these programs better or try out classes in hundreds of other subjects, join me on Udemy!

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April 21, 2017
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where to find remote jobs to work from home

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Digital nomad, work from homer, distributed team – there are many ways to label virtual companies, or a company that doesn’t feature one physical office. I work remotely, and it doesn’t escape me every day how lucky I am. No commute to work or worrying about weather, no layering up for a frigid office even in the summer months, no one to steal your lunch out of the community fridge. Plus I really love my job! Virtual companies are becoming more popular than ever, and for people who want the benefit of a home office without the stresses of being their own boss, it’s important to know how to navigate these sites! By virtue of having a remote job already, I’ve become pretty familiar as to where they get posted, and what to look out for to know you’re looking at a legitimate, reputable company. Today I’m sharing some of the tips I’ve given my friends when they’re on the hunt for remote jobs!

Direct company websites: As with traditional jobs, every remote company will post their openings on their own website first. If there’s a specific company you have your eye on, check in with their jobs page occasionally, and sign up if they have a newsletter they announce postings to. Eventbrite is a good example of a company that features this! This helps to make sure you’re on a legit website and gives the benefit of applying directly without any third party application or the possibility of a trimmed job description. Some companies that hire remote workers include Basecamp, Amazon, Museum Hack, and even Teach for America!

Jobspresso: This is my favorite remote job aggregator, and the place I have all my remote-seeking friends start. They have a great interface, easy search tools, and put the job title as well as the company on the front page. Jobspresso also features easy categories, so you can browse through the job types you’re looking for in one click. They tend to get more customer service and marketing/content jobs than other websites mentioned here.

WeWorkRemotely: Not the prettiest of the sites I’m outlining, but super high quality jobs posted here, and it’s affiliated with Basecamp. This also means that they’re updated a bit more infrequently and don’t have quite as many positions as the other sites, but they’re highly vetted and of good quality.

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April 14, 2017
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types of remote jobs that let you work from home

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Working from home has been growing in popularity – whether it’s owning your own business, freelancing, or contracting for a larger company, there are many ways you can start working from home. No more commute, no freezing office, and no annoying cubicle neighbors – sounds awesome, right? While it is really great, it’s not always as easy as it sounds, and these kinds of jobs are competitive. Today I’m sharing some ideas of jobs you can get to work from home.

Even a lot of traditional companies are hiring remote employees now. Businesses are going virtual for a lot of reasons: a smaller team means lower overhead cost for space, and eliminating the commute can also lead to higher employee happiness. Workers are using it as negotiating tools as well when landing a new job: sometimes they’re willing to accept lower pay for a full- or part-time telecommute schedule.

There are a lot of businesses you can start yourself to work from home, but there’s a difference between working for a company and being your own boss. Running your own business has tax implications, requires organization and responsibility that not everyone is inclined toward, not to mention benefits can be lacking vs. a traditional job. Since owning my own business is not my area of expertise, I’m instead focusing (primarily) on types of jobs for companies that hire remote workers.

Web Design/Development:  One of the most popular remote jobs, developers and designers have been working remotely for many years. It takes some training, but with dev bootcamp schools (many available virtually, so you can even learn from home) offering certifications in a few months, it’s not like going back to school for four years to walk away with a new degree. Start now and you could be looking for a remote dev job by the end of summer!

Music Industry Jobs: Many members of road crews might live in Nashville, but it’s not a requirement since there’s no office to check into every day. Crew members like guitar techs, sound engineers, tour managers, merch sellers, and accountants tend to meet up a few days before heading out on the road, meaning they can keep their home bases wherever they’d like. These jobs obviously require extensive travel, but if that’s not your speed, there are other music options – if you have an outgoing personality, a booking agent or promotions position would be great for you. Every performing rights organization hires remote employees as well for jobs ranging from research to licensing sales.

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April 7, 2017
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